Get Mosquito Smart

Diseases

WHAT ARE THESE DISEASES? LET'S LEARN ABOUT THEM!

test-tubeZika, dengue, and chikungunya are viruses spread by the same types of Aedes species of mosquitoes.
All three viruses can cause similar symptoms. In order to know if you have one of these diseases, you have to go to the doctor and get a blood or urine test.

People can be infected with these viruses and not know it.

  • Even if a person doesn't have symptoms, the virus can still be in their blood.
  • Mosquitoes can bite someone who is infected. After the virus has developed, which can take a week or more, mosquitoes can pass the virus to someone who is healthy.

Zika

Do you have a fever, rash, joint pain, or red eyes? It could be Zika.

zika-img

WHAT HAPPENS TO YOU?

  • The illness is usually mild. The symptoms can last several days to a week.
  • People usually don't get sick enough to go to the hospital, and they rarely die of Zika.
  • Many people might not even realize they are infected with the Zika virus. Four out of five people who have Zika don't have symptoms!
  • After you are bitten by an infected mosquito, it can take up to 2 weeks for you to notice symptoms, but they usually go away after 3-7 days.

HOW SERIOUS IS ZIKA?

Zika infection can cause birth defects, even in women who do not have symptoms, and can be spread through sex. Learn more about Zika & Pregnancy.

There is no vaccine to prevent infection or specific medicine to treat Zika.

ZIKA CAN CAUSE NEUROLOGICAL PROBLEMS

Though relatively rare, Zika is also linked to Guillain-Barre syndrome, that causes weakness in arms and legs. This can be a serious condition resulting in permanent paralysis in some people. Other neurological problems are also being studied.


Dengue

Do you a have fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, rash, and pain in the eyes, joints, and muscles? It could be dengue.

dengue-img

WHAT HAPPENS TO YOU?

After you are bitten by an infected mosquito, it can take up to 2 weeks for you to notice symptoms, but they usually go away in a week.

In general, younger children have milder symptoms than older children and adults.

HOW SERIOUS CAN DENGUE BE?

  • Dengue can be very severe.
  • There are four types of dengue virus.
  • People who get infected with more than one type are at risk for shock and hemorrhage.
  • In severe cases, people die.

There is no specific medicine to treat dengue.


Chikungunya

Do you have a fever with joint, muscle, eye pain...or a rash? It could be chikungunya.

person-lightning

WHAT HAPPENS TO YOU?

Chikungunya can be very painful! You can't even get out of bed to go to the bathroom because your joints and muscles hurt so much.

After you are bitten by an infected mosquito, it can take up to 3-7 days for you to notice symptoms, but they usually go away after a week. For some people the pain can last for two years.

There is no vaccine to prevent or specific medicine to treat chikungunya.


WHO IS AT RISK FOR THESE DISEASES?

Anyone who lives in, commutes or travels to an area where these viruses are found.


WHERE IS ZIKA?

In the World

Zika_global_trans

Countries in the Americas and Caribbean where Zika is spreading.
Last updated: December 14, 2016.

In the United States

Zika_USA_cases

Total number of people diagnosed with Zika related to travel to a country where Zika is spreading, 2015-2016. This includes people who traveled to areas with Zika, their sexual contacts, or their babies infected in the womb.
Data from Centers for Disease Control & Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/united-states.html.
Last updated: March 15, 2017.

Zika_USA_local_trans

Counties where Zika virus has been spread by mosquitoes in the last month.
Data from Centers for Disease Control & Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/united-states.html.
Last updated: November 30, 2016.

In Mexico

Zika_Mexico_cases

States where Zika is spreading in Mexico, and the number of people diagnosed with Zika, 2015-2016.
Data from Mexico's Sistema Nacional de Vigilancia Epidemiologica: http://www.epidemiologia.salud.gob.mx/dgae/avisos/zika.html.
Last updated: March 13, 2017.

Visit CDC's Traveler's Health website for health information about your destination. CDC Website

ver. 20170320

TOP

Menu